Research

As a bioarchaeologist trained in the often disparate fields of anthropology and classics, I have a strong commitment to interdisciplinary approaches to my research, which bridges: a) biological anthropology and archaeology; b) social science and humanistic studies; and c) classics and anthropology. My methodological and theoretical perspectives are drawn heavily from anthropology, osteology, demography, historiography, philology, ecology, applied mathematics, and chemistry. More specifically, my primary research foci are bioarchaeology, palaeopathology, classical archaeology, biological distance, and stable isotope analysis. I’m interested in theorizing migration in antiquity, including transnational and diasporic approaches, and in using bioarchaeological techniques and data to understand urban development and collapse.